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London Electoral History 1700-1850

"" Professor Charles Harvey "" Penelope Corfield "" Dr Edmund M.Green ""
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This brief account reviews the core principles of flexible classification, as applied within the London Electoral Database. Read more:


This overview provides an alphabetical list of 133 candidates who appear in an aggregate tally of 67 contests as recorded in the London Electoral Database for 1700-1852, and their individual coding. Read more:
This brief account explains the system of voter classification in the London Electoral Database. Read more:


This account lists all 78 livery companies in the City of London which were active in 1832, showing all available information about their membership 1700-1850, plus the coding for each company within the London Electoral Database. Read more:

This brief account notes the problems in calculating turnout; and provides estimated turnout in five elections for which sufficient information survives. Read more:



This account outlines the spatial classifications, based upon from local administrative boundaries, used within the London Electoral Database and notes the importance of parochial and other local allegiances. Read more:


This note lists the Hundreds, Divisions and Parishes within the county of Middlesex, together with their populations in 1801. Read more:



This note lists the Wards and Parishes within the City of London, together with information about eighteenth-century housing and the number of houses/inhabitants in 1851. Read more:


This note lists the Parishes within the city of Westminster, together with the number of Poll book records generated per parish at each election within the London Electoral Database. Read more:

This note lists the Parishes and Wards within the post-1832 constituency of Marylebone. Read more:









This lengthy report covers a range of themes: from general issues in classifying occupations; to problems in classifying occupations for economic-field analysis; common classifications for occupations in pre-industrial economies; the Booth/Armstrong classification for occupations in industrial economies – and the enriched four-tier version adopted in the LED; and a note on individual occupational attributions in the LED, with an example showing the distribution of voter’s occupations by occupational sector in the city of Westminster, 1784. Read more:
This report considers the difficulties in classifying individuals into social classes: in turn, assessing the problems in deriving class from raw occupational data; stressing the contemporary uncertainties about the number of classes; summarising the problems of undertaking social classifications from imperfect data; and providing information on self-classification by status titles as used by an elite minority in the years 1700-1850. Read more:


This lengthy report explains the context in which a minority of electors or ratepayers within the London Electoral Database supplied information about their titles, offices, ranks, and degrees. The detailed sections discuss the titled nobility; titled commoners; professional titles; the rules of precedence and modes of address for men; the rules of precedence and modes of address for women; and a comment on the nuances of social status in Britain 1700-1850. Read more:
This brief note reports on the standard Soundex coding system, which is used for classification of surnames within the London Electoral Database. Read more:






 
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